Archive for Writers

Arthur Miller

Posted in Central Cemetery (CT) with tags , , on May 31, 2016 by Cade

miller4

October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005

Perhaps one of the most influential and prolific playwrights in American history, Arthur Miller explored themes such as family relationships, personal legacy and social responsibility in his plays – all set against the backdrop of the individual vs. society at-large. The masterpieces within his body of work look like a one-man anthology of the greatest American Dramas ever written:

Death of a Salesman
All My Sons
A View from the Bridge
The Crucible

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Harriet Beecher Stowe

Posted in Phillips Academy Cemetery with tags , on August 17, 2015 by Cade

stowe2June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896

Harriet Beecher was a very well-educated writer from a very religious family who wrote dozens of books. But, none are as well-known or had as much of an impact as her landmark 1852 work, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Originally produced as a serial for the abolitionist newspaper, The National Era, the story’s popularity (and accompanying controversy) demanded it be released in novel form. Cabin‘s depiction of the daily, oppressed life of slaves in America both enrapt a sympathetic people in the North and enraged Southerners whose very way of life depended on the slaves Stowe portrayed. The book sold outrageous amounts of copies. Continue reading

James Fenimore Cooper

Posted in Christ Churchyard (NY) with tags , on July 20, 2015 by Cade

cooper1September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851

James Fenimore Cooper was one of the most popular American writers of the 19th century. His quasi-Romantic  writings tended toward the political especially in the sphere of Post-Revolutionary land rights and Native American relations. This is more than evident in his 5 novel series, the Leatherstocking Tales (which includes his masterwork, 1826’s The Last of the Mohicans.) Groundbreaking for the time, these stories were the first of their kind to feature Native American characters to the degree they did – for better AND worse. Continue reading

L.M. Montgomery

Posted in Cavendish Cemetery with tags , on August 3, 2014 by Cade

montgomery1November 30, 1874 – April 24, 1942

How much power and influence can one woman have? In Lucy Maud Montgomery’s case, enough to single-handedly transform a 19th Century idyllic seaside farm town into the Canadian version of Branson, Missouri – complete with amusement parks, go-karts and a Ripley’s Believe it or Not! Thanks to Montgomery’s classic “Anne of Green Gables” book series, the titular house and the surrounding area have become Prince Edward Island’s top tourist attraction and stand in stark contrast to the rest of the still-mostly-rural island province.

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Honoré de Balzac

Posted in Père Lachaise Cemetery with tags , on April 2, 2014 by Cade

balzac1May 20, 1799 – August 18, 1850

A noted pioneer of the Realist movement in European literature, Honoré de Balzac was a highly influential novelist and playwright. Balzac’s work was known for its flawed characters and minute detail that outlined life in his native France (specifically, Paris) in the time after Napoleon. The energy that drove his characters and stories wasn’t just creation. The man, himself, lived life at a torrid pace. Many of his finished novels and plays are the result of meticulous – borderline obsessive – revision and gallons upon gallons of coffee. Continue reading

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Posted in Mt. Auburn Cemetery with tags , , on February 28, 2014 by Cade

longfellow1February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was a popular American Romantic poet whose lyrical poems often depicted historic or mythological narratives. Perhaps his most famous work is “Paul Revere’s Ride.”

Longfellow was born in Portland, ME and attended Bowdoin College. He spent many years abroad in Europe and learned a number of languages. This would lead to him becoming one of the more important translators of the 19th Century. In fact, he was the first American to translate Dante’s Divine Comedy. Though his works were met with popular success, his life was filled with tragedy. Continue reading

William S. Burroughs

Posted in Bellefontaine Cemetery with tags , , , on December 26, 2013 by Cade

burroughs1February 5, 1914 – August 2, 1997

William Seward Burroughs II was a highly influential and controversial American writer of novels, essays, short stories and poems. His love of subversion and satire coupled with his outlandish personal experiences made him one of the more colorful and unique voices of the 20th Century. A prominent member/founder of the Beat movement, his most famous works include Naked Lunch, Junkie and Queer. Burroughs was well involved with fellow Beats Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, at times living with one or the other in various New York and Paris locales. He was also big into drugs. Like heavy, heroin and morphine-type drugs. Continue reading