Archive for the Forest Lawn Glendale Category

Alan Ladd

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on May 22, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 

ladd1September 3, 1913 – January 29, 1964

Alan Walbridge1 Ladd was an athletic young man who struggled to catch a break in the film industry (due, largely, to his lack of height.) But, once he did, he came to personify the genres in which he worked. After a bit part in a small film called Citizen Kane, Ladd found steady work in westerns and gangster movies throughout the 1940’s and ’50’s. It was the former that landed him his most iconic role, that of the titular drifter in Shane. Alan often costarred with the beautiful – and equally diminutive – Veronica Lake. The pair made seven films together. Many of which are Film Noir classics. Continue reading

Jeanette MacDonald and Gene Raymond

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 23, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 macdonald1June 18, 1903 – January 14, 1965

Jeanette MacDonald was one of the most popular singer/actresses throughout the golden age of the Hollywood musical. Her legendary professional partnership with Nelson Eddy produced memorable classics (including Naughty Marietta and Sweethearts) for MGM. Rumors of off-screen romance plagued the duo throughout their lives. After her death from multiple heart ailments at the age of 61, Eddy all but confirmed the rumors were true. MacDonald was a powerful soprano who worked her way out of the Broadway chorus lines to become one of the most successful screen performers of her era. She used her talent and influence to help introduce opera to many who had never heard it before. When not making movies, she toured extensively giving concerts all around the world and was noted for her work with the U.S. Army throughout World War II. In addition to her maybe/maybe not secret affair with Nelson, she was married to… Continue reading

Clara Bow

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 14, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 

bow1July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965

 Hollywood’s first “It Girl,” silent-era starlet Clara Bow was literally the “It” girl. Her turn in the 1927 comedy “It” garnered all sorts of attention and made her a star. In fact, she would go on to appear in more than 50 films (most of which were silent) over her short 12-year career during which she was one of the top box-office draws in the country. Her foray into “talkies” was just as successful. Audiences loved her. Investors loved her. Fellow actor Rex Bell loved her. Continue reading

Walt Disney

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on September 13, 2013 by Cade

disney1December 5, 1901 – December 15, 1966

“I only hope that we don’t lose sight of one thing – that it was all started by a mouse.” – Walt Disney

Walt Disney may have one of the most recognizable names in all of Hollywood history. The fledgling newspaper illustrator in Kansas City, Missouri turned his passion for drawing characters into an entertainment empire the likes of which has few equals. It was, of course, his somewhat accidental creation of Mickey Mouse that jettisoned Walt into the limelight. Continue reading

Gummo Marx

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on September 5, 2013 by Cade

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October 21, 18921 – April 21, 1977

Milton “Gummo” Marx was the 2nd youngest of the Marx Brothers comedy team.  He was a part of the family’s early vaudeville days but was drafted into the Army near the end of World War I and never joined them in their film careers.  After his military service, he returned to show business as an agent. He represented his brother, Groucho, and a number of other writers and actors. Continue reading

Chico Marx

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , , on September 5, 2013 by Cade

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March 22, 1887 – October 11, 1961

Leonard “Chico” Marx was the oldest of the legendary Marx Brothers comedy team.  Born in New York City, Chico (pronounced “Chick-o”) and his brothers performed from an early age in vaudeville with their uncle.  All of the brothers were talented musicians, but it was the more-or-less accidental discovery that they were hilarious that eventually launched them into super-stardom.  Chico adopted a stage persona of a rural Italian who dressed in baggy clothes and Bavarian hat. Continue reading

Spencer Tracy

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags on June 17, 2013 by Cade

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April 5, 1900 – June 10, 1967

Spencer Bonaventure Tracy (real name) was a fixture in the so-called “Golden Age” of Hollywood. The Milwaukee-born actor was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor nine times. He won twice. His onscreen partnership with Katharine Hepburn as well as their “private” decades-long affair made for, perhaps, the biggest Hollywood romance of the 20th century. The pair made 9 movies together and shared a 26 year relationship despite Tracy still being married to his estranged wife, Louise.  Ah, but it’s Hollywood. Who cares?  What’s important is that Spencer Tracy is routinely mentioned in conversations about the greatest actors of all time. Continue reading

George Burns and Gracie Allen

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on May 28, 2013 by Cade

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January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996
July 26, 1895 – August 27, 1964

One of the great comedy teams of all-time, Burns and Allen were vaudeville, radio, film and television legends.  They met in New Jersey and embarked on a career – and life – together that would entertain audiences for decades. George was the classic straight man to Gracie’s madcap comic.  They eventually made the jump from stage to film and television and moved their popular radio program, The Burns and Allen Show, to television, where it ran for 8 years.  In 1964, after a long battle with heart disease, Gracie said “Goodnight” and died. Leaving George to continue his career without his partner and wife. Continue reading

Errol Flynn

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on May 16, 2013 by Cade

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June 20, 1909 – October 14, 1959

I don’t throw the term “swashbuckler” around lightly.  But Errol Flynn was a swashbuckler if there ever was one.  The Australian-born star of  early Hollywood flicks such as The Adventures of Robin Hood, The Charge of the Light Brigade and Santa Fe Trail was known for his devil-may-care attitude and suave persona.   He famously womanized and drank and had contentious working relationships with a number of his female costars, most notably, Bette Davis, who used opportunities to hit Flynn on camera as opportunities to HIT him. Continue reading

Larry Fine

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 8, 2013 by Cade

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October 5, 1902 – January 24, 1975

Louis Feinberg – known to the world as Larry Fine – was a vaudeville and film entertainer who was a member of the classic comedy team, The Three Stooges. Larry was asked by creator Ted Healy to join brothers Moe and Shemp Howard1 in their stage act. He said ‘yes’ and the rest was history.

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