Archive for Sanctuary of Heritage

Alan Ladd

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on May 22, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 

ladd1September 3, 1913 – January 29, 1964

Alan Walbridge1 Ladd was an athletic young man who struggled to catch a break in the film industry (due, largely, to his lack of height.) But, once he did, he came to personify the genres in which he worked. After a bit part in a small film called Citizen Kane, Ladd found steady work in westerns and gangster movies throughout the 1940’s and ’50’s. It was the former that landed him his most iconic role, that of the titular drifter in Shane. Alan often costarred with the beautiful – and equally diminutive – Veronica Lake. The pair made seven films together. Many of which are Film Noir classics. Continue reading

Jeanette MacDonald and Gene Raymond

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 23, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 macdonald1June 18, 1903 – January 14, 1965

Jeanette MacDonald was one of the most popular singer/actresses throughout the golden age of the Hollywood musical. Her legendary professional partnership with Nelson Eddy produced memorable classics (including Naughty Marietta and Sweethearts) for MGM. Rumors of off-screen romance plagued the duo throughout their lives. After her death from multiple heart ailments at the age of 61, Eddy all but confirmed the rumors were true. MacDonald was a powerful soprano who worked her way out of the Broadway chorus lines to become one of the most successful screen performers of her era. She used her talent and influence to help introduce opera to many who had never heard it before. When not making movies, she toured extensively giving concerts all around the world and was noted for her work with the U.S. Army throughout World War II. In addition to her maybe/maybe not secret affair with Nelson, she was married to… Continue reading

Clara Bow

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 14, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 

bow1July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965

 Hollywood’s first “It Girl,” silent-era starlet Clara Bow was literally the “It” girl. Her turn in the 1927 comedy “It” garnered all sorts of attention and made her a star. In fact, she would go on to appear in more than 50 films (most of which were silent) over her short 12-year career during which she was one of the top box-office draws in the country. Her foray into “talkies” was just as successful. Audiences loved her. Investors loved her. Fellow actor Rex Bell loved her. Continue reading

George Burns and Gracie Allen

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on May 28, 2013 by Cade

burnsandallen

January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996
July 26, 1895 – August 27, 1964

One of the great comedy teams of all-time, Burns and Allen were vaudeville, radio, film and television legends.  They met in New Jersey and embarked on a career – and life – together that would entertain audiences for decades. George was the classic straight man to Gracie’s madcap comic.  They eventually made the jump from stage to film and television and moved their popular radio program, The Burns and Allen Show, to television, where it ran for 8 years.  In 1964, after a long battle with heart disease, Gracie said “Goodnight” and died. Leaving George to continue his career without his partner and wife. Continue reading

Nat King Cole

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , , on March 17, 2013 by Cade

cole1

March 17, 1919 – February 15, 1965

Nathaniel Adams Coles was born in Alabama, raised in Chicago, and, from an early age, began a long career in music that would lead to him becoming one of the most recognizable voices of the 20th century.  Nat dropped the “s” from his last name and picked up the nursery-rhyme-inspired middle name “King” and burst his buttery-voiced way into the Big Band, Jazz and Pop music worlds. Also a gifted pianist, Cole made a lasting impact with such mega-hits as “Unforgettable,” “L-O-V-E” and “The Christmas Song.” He was also the first African-American to host his own television variety program, The Nat King Cole Show.

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