Archive for April, 2014

Jeanette MacDonald and Gene Raymond

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 23, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 macdonald1June 18, 1903 – January 14, 1965

Jeanette MacDonald was one of the most popular singer/actresses throughout the golden age of the Hollywood musical. Her legendary professional partnership with Nelson Eddy produced memorable classics (including Naughty Marietta and Sweethearts) for MGM. Rumors of off-screen romance plagued the duo throughout their lives. After her death from multiple heart ailments at the age of 61, Eddy all but confirmed the rumors were true. MacDonald was a powerful soprano who worked her way out of the Broadway chorus lines to become one of the most successful screen performers of her era. She used her talent and influence to help introduce opera to many who had never heard it before. When not making movies, she toured extensively giving concerts all around the world and was noted for her work with the U.S. Army throughout World War II. In addition to her maybe/maybe not secret affair with Nelson, she was married to… Continue reading

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Jack Buck

Posted in Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery with tags , , on April 22, 2014 by Cade

buck1August 21, 1924 – June 18, 2002

John Francis “Jack” Buck was a Hall of Fame broadcaster primarily known for his work for the St. Louis Cardinals. In addition to his play-by-play work for St. Louis, he also covered radio for more than a dozen World Series and Superbowl broadcasts as well as other, prominent events. Buck served in the military as a young man where he received a Purple Heart in France during World War II. After the war – and college – Jack began his career as a broadcaster, working alongside fellow legends Harry Caray and Joe Garagiola. He worked his way through the ranks and became the Cardinals’ go-to play-by-play guy in 1969. Continue reading

Max Factor

Posted in Hillside Memorial Park with tags on April 16, 2014 by Cade


factor3
September 15, 1872 – August 30, 1938

Little Maksymilian Faktorowicz became interested in cosmetics and hair-styling at a young age. By the time he was 18, he had worked for cosmeticians and wigmakers in Germany and Russia. After a brief (mandatory) stint in the military, Max was named the official cosmetics expert for the Russian royal family. Things we going well, except for the fact that growing anti-Jewish sentiment was starting to rear its head in Eastern Europe. So, he moved to America with his wife and kids and started an empire. Continue reading

Clara Bow

Posted in Forest Lawn Glendale with tags , on April 14, 2014 by Cade

Disclaimer: The last time I visited Forest Lawn Glendale and the Freedom Mausoleum, this blog wasn’t even a thought in my mind. So, there were a number of graves I visited but didn’t photograph. I hesitated to write a post about these celebrities, but, in the end, figured “why not?”. This is one of those posts.

 

bow1July 29, 1905 – September 27, 1965

 Hollywood’s first “It Girl,” silent-era starlet Clara Bow was literally the “It” girl. Her turn in the 1927 comedy “It” garnered all sorts of attention and made her a star. In fact, she would go on to appear in more than 50 films (most of which were silent) over her short 12-year career during which she was one of the top box-office draws in the country. Her foray into “talkies” was just as successful. Audiences loved her. Investors loved her. Fellow actor Rex Bell loved her. Continue reading

Aaron Spelling

Posted in Hillside Memorial Park with tags on April 4, 2014 by Cade

spelling1April 22, 1923 – June 23, 2006

The most prolific American television writer/producer ever, Aaron Spelling was directly responsible for hits, both major (Charlie’s Angels, The Mod Squad, Beverly Hills 90210, Melrose Place, The Love Boat, Hart to Hart, Charmed, Starsky & Hutch, The Rookies, 7th Heaven, Fantasy Island, Dynasty) and minor (The Heights, Models Inc., Pacific Palisades, Summerland, Tori Spelling.) His career spanned decades and influenced generations. Continue reading

Sharon Tate

Posted in Holy Cross Cemetery with tags on April 3, 2014 by Cade

tate1January 24, 1943 – August 9, 1969

Sharon Tate was a B-Movie actress who was just on the cusp of mainstream stardom when the unthinkable happened…and made her a household name.

Tate’s career as an actress was modest, at best. She had bit parts on television shows like The Beverly Hillbillies and had major roles in cult movies like Valley of the Dolls. But her talents took some work. Being a tall, beautiful head-turner certainly helped cover over many of the confidence issues that plagued her early career. Positive reviews of her comedic performance opposite Dean Martin in 1969’s The Wrecking Crew led to a more confident Tate and her career was finally shaping up. Continue reading

Honoré de Balzac

Posted in Père Lachaise Cemetery with tags , on April 2, 2014 by Cade

balzac1May 20, 1799 – August 18, 1850

A noted pioneer of the Realist movement in European literature, Honoré de Balzac was a highly influential novelist and playwright. Balzac’s work was known for its flawed characters and minute detail that outlined life in his native France (specifically, Paris) in the time after Napoleon. The energy that drove his characters and stories wasn’t just creation. The man, himself, lived life at a torrid pace. Many of his finished novels and plays are the result of meticulous – borderline obsessive – revision and gallons upon gallons of coffee. Continue reading