Archive for Actors

Dudley Moore

Posted in Hillside Cemetery (Scotch Plains) with tags , , , on October 26, 2020 by Cade

moored1April 19, 1935 – March 27, 2002

What Dudley Moore lacked in stature, he more than made up for in talent. The diminutive English actor/comedian was also a brilliant musician who learned to play organ and piano at a young age. His musical ability led to scholarships and eventually to Oxford, where he fell in love with jazz…and comedy.

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Jason Robards

Posted in Oak Lawn Cemetery with tags , on September 28, 2020 by Cade

July 26, 1922 – December 26, 2000

Jason Nelson Robards, Jr. was a highly-regarded American stage and screen actor. Born in 1922, Robards’ father was a silent-era Hollywood actor who struggled during the transition to “talkies” and, though Jason initially resented Hollywood’s treatment of his father, sometimes the acting gene just prevails. Following a harrowing Naval service in World War II, Robards launched his own acting career in New York in the late 1940s. Continue reading

Mary Tyler Moore

Posted in Oak Lawn Cemetery with tags , on September 21, 2020 by Cade

December 29, 1936 – January 25, 2017

Groundbreaking actress and producer, Mary Tyler Moore, changed the game. Though, she was already enjoying some working success in her young career, she blasted into the national eye when Carl Reiner cast her opposite Dick Van Dyke in 1961’s The Dick Van Dyke Show. Moore’s Laura Petrie not only provided a brilliant comedic compliment to Van Dyke’s energetic Rob, but also re-imagined the role of the “housewife” as something more than just dinner and slippers. Moore would win her first Emmy for her work on the show, and she wasn’t about to slow down.

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Gregory Hines

Posted in St. Volodymyr's Cemetery with tags , , , on August 18, 2019 by Cade

February 14, 1946 – August 9, 2003

Tony and Emmy award-winning dancer, singer and actor, Gregory Hines, was always on the stage. From a young age, Gregory (along with brother, Maurice, and sometimes their father) would entertain audiences in nightclubs throughout their native New York City. Especially adept at tap dancing, young Gregory eventually headed to Hollywood and found work as a musician and actor. Continue reading

Corey Haim

Posted in Pardes Shalom Cemetery with tags , on August 9, 2019 by Cade

December 23, 1971 – March 10, 2010

Once a “Lost Boy”…

1980’s teen heartthrob, Corey Haim, got into acting at a young age when he was discovered at one of his sister’s auditions. By the time he was 15, he was already playing lead roles (Lucas, Stephen King’s Silver Bullet), but it was 1987’s vampire teen classic, The Lost Boys, that launched Haim – and a fair number of other young stars – into the limelight. It was on the set of Boys where Haim met his lifelong on-and-off-screen friend, Corey Feldman. The two Coreys would dominate the teen box office together for the next several years, churning out hits like License to Drive and Dream a Little Dream.  And dream, they did. Continue reading

Peter Lawford

Posted in Cremated, Westwood Memorial Park with tags , , , , on April 1, 2019 by Cade

lawford1September 7, 1923 – December 24, 1984

Peter Sydney Ernest Lawford was a successful actor, to be sure. The English actor dutifully rose through the Hollywood ranks, eventually landing lead or supporting roles in hits like Easter Parade and Royal Wedding. He appeared on television throughout the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s and his later career found him not only appearing in popular movies like Exodus and The Longest Day but also acting as producer on a number of films. It was, however, his off-screen life that garnered by far the most attention. Continue reading

Paul Gleason

Posted in Westwood Memorial Park with tags , on March 19, 2019 by Cade

May 4, 1939 – May 27, 2006

Paul Gleason was an aspiring baseball player who – with the help of Ozzie Nelson – stumbled into a career in acting. As he was known to do, Nelson offered the young ballplayer a guest spot on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet and Gleason was bitten by the acting bug. Gleason’s most notable roles included stints on the television shows All My Children and Boy Meets World. But, he’s perhaps most widely recognized for film roles in classic ’80s movies like Die Hard, Trading Places and The Breakfast Club. His memorable portrayal of assistant principal Richard Vernon in The Breakfast Club cemented his place in pop culture history. Gleason continued to work in TV and movies for years before he succumbed to lung cancer at the age of 67. Continue reading

Fay Wray

Posted in Hollywood Forever Cemetery with tags , on March 15, 2019 by Cade

September 15, 1907 – August 8, 2004

One could do worse than to be associated with a giant ape for the last 70 years of one’s life. Throughout the 1920s, Vina Fay Wray was an up-and-coming starlet under contract with Paramount Pictures where she made more than a dozen films and successfully navigated the dreaded transition from “silents” to “talkies.” When her Paramount contract was up, Wray shopped around and eventually signed movie deals with a number of other studios, including RKO pictures. It was with RKO that she shot to stardom as the ultimate damsel in distress in 1933’s seminal horror film King Kong. She followed Kong up with a lifetime of credits. Continue reading

George Jessel

Posted in Hillside Memorial Park with tags , , on March 11, 2019 by Cade

April 3, 1898 – May 23, 1981

Known as the “Toastmaster General,” vaudevillian funnyman, George Jessel, took his stage act to Hollywood in the 1920s. Over the course of his 60 year career, he appeared in radio, film and television in addition to recording songs and producing dozens of movies. His affable wit made him a popular emcee and he hosted a number of banquets and roasts for organizations like the Friars Club and the U.S.O. In 1925, he starred in the Broadway stage version of The Jazz Singer and caught the eye of Warner Bros. execs who decided to produce it as the first ever “talking” film. Jessel apparently demanded too much money to be in the movie and the role eventually and famously went to Al Jolson. Continue reading

Andrew Koenig

Posted in Hollywood Forever Cemetery with tags , on March 5, 2019 by Cade

August 17, 1968 – February 16, 2010

Joshua Andrew Koenig was an actor, writer and activist. The son of Star Trek star, Walter Koenig, Andrew was most widely recognized for his portrayal of the lovable (and dim) Richard “Boner” Stabone for 4 seasons on the hit 1980s sitcom, Growing Pains. The remainder of his career saw him appearing on stage and working on independent films, voice over projects and behind the scenes as writer, director and editor on a number of projects. Koenig became heavily involved in the U.S. Campaign for Burma and often publicly protested China’s treatment of the Burmese people. Andrew battled severe depression for most of his life. Continue reading