Archive for November, 2020

Glen Campbell

Posted in Campbell's Cemetery with tags , , , , , on November 23, 2020 by Cade

April 22, 1936 – August 8, 2017

Glen Campbell was not the first “Rhinestone Cowboy,” but he’s arguably the most famous. At least, that’s what you might suspect judging him solely by his biggest hit.

Despite personally resonating with the titular character in the chart-topping 1975 song, Campbell was so much more than a sequined journeyman waiting for his turn in the spotlight.

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Minnie Pearl

Posted in Mt. Hope Cemetery (TN) with tags , , on November 16, 2020 by Cade

October 25, 1912 – March 4, 1996

All together now: “How-DEEE!”

The stage of the Grand Ole Opry is hallowed ground. Whether it was the historic stage of the famed Ryman Auditorium, or the newfangled stage at the modern Opry House, setting foot upon it can be life-changing for anyone with the fortune to do so. It transforms performers. None more literally than a young comedienne named Sarah Colley, who stepped onto the Opry stage and became…Minnie Pearl.

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Andrew Johnson

Posted in Andrew Johnson National Cemetery with tags , on November 9, 2020 by Cade

December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875

Andrew Johnson was the 17th President of the United States. Becoming President following Abraham Lincoln’s assassination and preceding Grant’s administration, Johnson was a sort of “historical stop-gap” that was widely regarded as – at best – ineffectual. The country was a mess thanks to the Civil War and Johnson’s attempts at a quick reconstruction were mostly bungled. He wanted the southern states back in the union quickly. He didn’t care if they adopted laws and codes that protected the now-freed former slaves or not. Congress strongly disagreed. Johnson vetoed any bill they put forward. They impeached him. Very little got done. Continue reading

Patsy Cline

Posted in Shenandoah Memorial Park with tags , , on November 2, 2020 by Cade

cline1September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963

If country music had official royalty, Patsy Cline was its first queen.

Virginia Patterson Hensley knew she wanted to be a singer from the very beginning. Though she worked odd jobs in her Virginia hometown out of a need to help her family, it wasn’t long until she was aiming higher and soliciting auditions wherever and whenever she could. Following a brief illness at the age of 15 that affected her throat…and therefore her voice, Ginny realized quickly that she had been given a gift. Local radio shows and a stint with a regional country band followed and soon, her gift was being shared on television and larger radio markets.

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