Archive for the Green-Wood Cemetery Category

Jean-Michel Basquiat

Posted in Green-Wood Cemetery with tags , , on January 23, 2017 by Cade

basquiat1December 22, 1960 – August 12, 1988

Jean-Michel Basquiat was a significant neo-expressionist artist in the late-70s/early-80s New York City pop-cultural scene. Rising to notoriety as a street artist (he comprised half of the graffiti-art duo, SAMO), Basquiat eventually found a following in various galleries in Manhattan. His work consisted of both image and text, highly influenced by juxtaposition and dichotomy. Basquiat also created experimental music with his band, Gray (a nod to Gray’s Anatomy, the reference book that heavily influenced his work throughout his life – not the ABC television show that debuted 17 years after he died.) Through his art and music, he spoke out against institutionalized racism and power structures and made commentary on issues such as class struggle and heritage. Continue reading

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Leonard Bernstein

Posted in Green-Wood Cemetery with tags , on December 5, 2016 by Cade

bernstein1August 25, 1918 – October 14, 1990

“The other night I bippy nigh, blabba habba dooby die, mowt say hiddy lie, LEO-NARD BERN-STEIN!” – It’s The End Of The World As We Know It (And I Feel Fine) – R.E.M. (paraphrased)

Louis “Leonard” Bernstein was and is an American musical treasure. Reaching international acclaim, Bernstein is most widely known as the long-time musical director of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra and for his many stage and screen compositions. Bernstein grew up in Massachusetts, graduated from Harvard and, by way of grad school in Philadelphia, made his way to New York. It was in New York where he joined The Revuers and began his composing and conducting career. In 1943, he filled in as the main conductor for the NYPO and became an instant success. Continue reading

Fred Ebb

Posted in Green-Wood Cemetery with tags , , on November 28, 2016 by Cade

ebb1April 8, 1928 – September 11, 2004

Lyricist Fred Ebb worked with a number of composers throughout his career, but it was his partnership with John Kander that garnered him his biggest successes. Kander and Ebb wrote some of Broadway’s biggest all-time hits: Cabaret, Chicago, Kiss of the Spider Woman, among othersIn addition to the stage, they wrote for films as well. Most notably contributing the theme song to Martin Scorsese’s 1971 film New York, New York which was launched into the stratosphere by Frank Sinatra. Continue reading

Frank Morgan

Posted in Green-Wood Cemetery with tags , on November 13, 2016 by Cade

morgan1June 1, 1890 – September 18, 1949

Francis Wuppermann was an Oscar-nominated character actor who enjoyed immense success over the course of his 35 year career. Working under the stage name Frank Morgan, he was signed to a lifetime contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and worked prolifically for them for more than 2 decades. He appeared in several movies each year for MGM, but is most widely recognized for his multiple roles – including the titular character – in 1939’s The Wizard of Oz. Continue reading