Archive for July, 2015

Robin Williams

Posted in Cremated with tags on July 31, 2015 by Cade

williams1July 21, 1951 – August 11, 2014

Sometimes, it’s just completely outside the realm of possibility that a star that shines so bright can be extinguished. Such is the case with Robin Williams, one of the most talented and popular entertainers in the world for more than 30 years. As someone who grew up in the 1980’s, I could never have imagined a world that didn’t contain some form of Robin. From his star-making role as the titular Orkan on ABC’s Mork and Mindy to his Academy Award winning (dramatic) turn in Good Will Hunting, Williams was always there…always larger-than-life…always great.

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Norman Rockwell

Posted in Stockbridge Cemetery with tags , on July 27, 2015 by Cade

February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978

Norman Rockwell was a painter and illustrator who’s definitive style portraying every-day life in 20th Century America is instantly recognizable to generations of people. He spent nearly 50 years creating covers for The Saturday Evening Post, a weekly magazine that could be found in homes all across the country as well as countless other publications, books and stand-alone pieces. Rockwell’s ability to capture the “simple” life with humor and poignancy made him immensely popular. His ubiquitous work can still be seen today in doctors’ offices, during the holidays or in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

Personal note: There was a copy of No Swimming in our guest room when I was growing up for as far back as I can remember.

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James Fenimore Cooper

Posted in Christ Churchyard (NY) with tags , on July 20, 2015 by Cade

cooper1September 15, 1789 – September 14, 1851

James Fenimore Cooper was one of the most popular American writers of the 19th century. His quasi-Romantic  writings tended toward the political especially in the sphere of Post-Revolutionary land rights and Native American relations. This is more than evident in his 5 novel series, the Leatherstocking Tales (which includes his masterwork, 1826’s The Last of the Mohicans.) Groundbreaking for the time, these stories were the first of their kind to feature Native American characters to the degree they did – for better AND worse. Continue reading

Chester A. Arthur

Posted in Albany Rural Cemetery with tags , on July 13, 2015 by Cade

President Chester A. Arthur

October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886

A relatively quiet cog in the post-civil war New York political machine, Chester A. Arthur was thrust into the U.S. Presidency when his predecessor, James Garfield, was assassinated in the first year of their administration. Arthur served out the single term in surprisingly successful fashion considering his general lack of public opinion prior to being nominated as Garfield’s  vice-president. Originally from Vermont, Arthur studied and practiced Law in New York before getting into politics. His rise through the New York Republican “Stalwarts” put him at odds with Garfield and the two were never close. Continue reading

Janis Joplin

Posted in Cremated with tags , , , on July 8, 2015 by Cade

joplin1January 19, 1943 – October 4, 1970

“The Queen of Psychedelic Soul”

Janis Lyn Joplin worked her way through the 1960’s Haight-Ashbury scene with her Blues-influenced power-rock voice. Her love for Blues standards helped her make a name for herself in San Francisco and her native Texas. She was asked to join the psychedelic rock band Big Brother and Holding Company which, with Janis on lead vocals, collectively impressed the crowd at 1967’s Monterrey Pop Festival. Record labels came calling and Janis spent the next year on the road and in the studio with Big Brother. Audiences and critics couldn’t get enough of her unique power as a performer. Her public persona surpassed the band and she quickly went solo. During her brief time on top of the music world, she recorded dozens of songs including hits like “Me and Bobby McGee” and “Mercedes Benz.”

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