Gregory Hines

Posted in St. Volodymyr's Cemetery with tags , , , on August 18, 2019 by Cade

February 14, 1946 – August 9, 2003

Tony and Emmy award-winning dancer, singer and actor, Gregory Hines, was always on the stage. From a young age, Gregory (along with brother, Maurice, and sometimes their father) would entertain audiences in nightclubs throughout their native New York City. Especially adept at tap dancing, young Gregory eventually headed to Hollywood and found work as a musician and actor. Continue reading

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Corey Haim

Posted in Pardes Shalom Cemetery with tags , on August 9, 2019 by Cade

December 23, 1971 – March 10, 2010

Once a “Lost Boy”…

1980’s teen heartthrob, Corey Haim, got into acting at a young age when he was discovered at one of his sister’s auditions. By the time he was 15, he was already playing lead roles (Lucas, Stephen King’s Silver Bullet), but it was 1987’s vampire teen classic, The Lost Boys, that launched Haim – and a fair number of other young stars – into the limelight. It was on the set of Boys where Haim met his lifelong on-and-off-screen friend, Corey Feldman. The two Coreys would dominate the teen box office together for the next several years, churning out hits like License to Drive and Dream a Little Dream.  And dream, they did. Continue reading

Jeff Healey

Posted in Park Lawn Cemetery (ON) with tags , , on August 5, 2019 by Cade

healey2March 25, 1966 – March 2, 2008

Jeff Healey’s place in pop-culture extends well beyond the fact that he was a talented blues-rock guitarist and singer who had one really great year. His eponymous trio, The Jeff Healey Band, had a monster hit in Canada and the U.S. with 1989’s “Angel Eyes” and he dominated the Toronto club scene in the mid-to-late 1980s. After the success of their first single and album, The JHB went on to record four more albums over the ensuing dozen or so years. But, Jeff didn’t just front his blues-rock band. Continue reading

Emily Dickinson

Posted in West Cemetery (MA) with tags , , on July 15, 2019 by Cade

dickinson1
December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines MELANCHOLY as “depression of spirits dejection”

See also: Emily Dickinson

Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born, lived her entire life, and died in Amherst, Massachusetts. From a young age, Emily was troubled by and consumed with the idea of death. Losses throughout her life – beginning with her cousin and close friend, Sophia, when she was 14 – piled on and Dickinson withdrew more and more from social life as the decades went on. She was known later in life as a recluse who corresponded copiously with friend and relatives both near and far – some of whom she never met in person. Continue reading

Bob Fosse and Gwen Verdon

Posted in Cremated with tags , on July 8, 2019 by Cade

fosse_verdon1June 23, 1927 – September 23, 1987
January 13, 1925 – October 18, 2000

Bob Fosse and Gwen Verdon first met in 1955 on the original Broadway production of Damn Yankees. Fosse had found his way to Broadway via military variety shows and a brief stint in Hollywood. He had just come off the success of choreographing his first major show, The Pajama Game, when he was hired to do the same for Yankees. Verdon – already a Tony-winning dancer and featured actress – was given the chance at her first lead in the Adler/Ross musical comedy. The success of Yankees and the instant personal connection between star and choreographer led to one of the more intriguing and volatile partnerships in theatre history. Continue reading

Jerry Maren

Posted in Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills with tags , on June 26, 2019 by Cade

maren1January 24, 1920 – May 24, 2018

Gerard Marenghi, aka Jerry Maren, was an actor who was notable as the last surviving adult munchkin from the 1939 MGM classic film, The Wizard of Oz. Maren appeared as a member of the memorable “Lollipop Guild” during Dorothy’s introduction to the land of Oz. At the time of his death at the age of 98, he was also the last surviving actor with a speaking part in the movie. Continue reading

Peter Lawford

Posted in Cremated, Westwood Memorial Park with tags , , , , on April 1, 2019 by Cade

lawford1September 7, 1923 – December 24, 1984

Peter Sydney Ernest Lawford was a successful actor, to be sure. The English actor dutifully rose through the Hollywood ranks, eventually landing lead or supporting roles in hits like Easter Parade and Royal Wedding. He appeared on television throughout the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s and his later career found him not only appearing in popular movies like Exodus and The Longest Day but also acting as producer on a number of films. It was, however, his off-screen life that garnered by far the most attention. Continue reading