Maureen O’Hara

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery with tags , on July 26, 2021 by Cade

ohara1
August 17, 1920 – October 24, 2015

Maureen O’Hara is perhaps the most famous Irish actress of all time. Her expressive face and flaming auburn hair earned her the nickname “The Queen of Technicolor.” Bitten by the performing bug at a very young age, Maureen (born FitzSimons) studied drama, music and dance in Ireland throughout her youth. At 17, she was discovered in a stage production and invited to screen test in London by actor/director Charles Laughton. Despite her youth and her unhappiness with the screen test process, she signed a contract with Laughton and his new Mayflower Pictures. O’Hara’s career in London started slowly. Her most notable early appearance was in Alfred Hitchcock’s Jamaica Inn alongside Laughton. Her performance drew attention, though, and soon she was on a ship across the Atlantic with Laughton and her mother to begin filming with RKO Pictures on The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Continue reading

Lou Brock

Posted in Bellerive Gardens with tags , , , , , on July 19, 2021 by Cade

June 18, 1939 – September 6, 2020

As a baseball player, one could certainly do worse than follow the path of Lou Brock. From joining the baseball team in college in hopes of securing a scholarship to be able to stay in school…to setting stolen base records and becoming a first-ballot hall of famer, Brock’s baseball career was anything but typical.

He made the team in his first year at Southern University and batted a paltry .189.

He got better. Continue reading

Keith Whitley

Posted in Spring Hill Cemetery with tags , , , on July 12, 2021 by Cade

whitley1
July 1, 1954 – May 9, 1989

Jackie Keith Whitley was a bright star in 1980s Country Music. He quickly gained attention as a bluegrass singer and guitar player and moved to Nashville from his native Kentucky in 1983 to start a recording career. His first three album releases charted a dozen hits, culminating in three straight number 1 hits off of his 1988 album, Don’t Close Your Eyes. Continue reading

Charles Durning

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery with tags , on July 5, 2021 by Cade

durning1
February 28, 1923 – December 24, 2012

Charles Durning’s 50 year acting career covered all the bases. He got his start somewhat unexpectedly when – working as an usher in New York – he filled in for an incapacitated actor. Durning went on to appear in dozens of Broadway shows and eventually made his way into the film industry. In the 1970s, he appeared in classic films like The Sting, Dog Day Afternoon and The Muppet Movie. Television appearances followed as well as more movies. He notably co-starred in a couple of Coen Brothers’ movies and could be counted on to play Santa Claus whenever needed. Continue reading

John Glenn

Posted in Arlington National Cemetery with tags , , on June 28, 2021 by Cade

July 18, 1921 – December 8, 2016

As American heroes go, they don’t come much more American or heroic than John Glenn. As a Marine fighter pilot during World War II and the Korean War, Glenn was already well-decorated with military honors, but he became a household name in 1959 when he was named a member of the Mercury 7 – the United States’ first group of astronauts. In 1962, after backing up Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom on the first two manned Mercury missions (respectively), Glenn flew the Friendship 7 capsule into space on the project’s third mission and become the first man to orbit the Earth. Continue reading

William Shakespeare

Posted in Holy Trinity Church (UK) with tags , , on April 23, 2021 by Cade

April 26* 1564 – April 23 1616

It’s an odd juxtaposition that, considering he is near-universally regarded as the greatest English writer in history, so little is known about the actual life of William Shakespeare. The MAN was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK in April of 1564. By 1600, the LEGEND was already well on his way into the history books. The details of his private life are mostly lost to years and lack of records, but by 1592, Shakespeare was in London, acting and writing plays. He was most closely associated with the acting troupe, Lord Chamberlain’s Men, who originated most of his plays.  The troupe quickly became one of the most successful in London. In 1599, they built the Globe theatre where they performed to increasingly rave reviews and eventually caught the eye of newly coronated King James I.  With the monarch’s backing, the troupe rebranded in 1603 as The King’s Men. By this point, the six shareholders in the troupe, including William Shakespeare, were not only the toast of the town, but were very, very rich. Around 1613, Shakespeare retired to Stratford, where he died 3 years later at the age of 52. Continue reading

Jayne Mansfield

Posted in Fairview Cemetery (PA) with tags , , on March 8, 2021 by Cade

April 19, 1933 – June 29, 1967

Ah, the Hollywood machine of the 1950s and ’60s. The golden age of studio-driven film making. Every studio had its own stable of actors, directors and writers. There were film crews on every backlot and a blonde bombshell on every corner. With the rise in popularity of quintessential bombshell, Marylin Monroe, 20th Century Fox hedged their bets…and got themselves a second one. Continue reading

Eric Carr

Posted in Cedar Hill Cemetery (NY) with tags , , on March 1, 2021 by Cade

July 12, 1950 – November 24, 1991

Paul Caravello grew up in Brooklyn, New York idolizing – like many kids of his time – early rock ‘n’ roll bands like the Beatles. Caravello started dabbling in his own music during high school. A talented kid, he learned to play guitar, piano, drums and was also a vocalist. Over the course of the next decade, he joined a number of bands in and around New York that met with little success. By the age of 30, he had grown weary and was about to call it quits on his music career when a friend mentioned that the iconic rock band, Kiss, was looking for a new drummer.

Continue reading

Elizabeth Montgomery

Posted in Cremated with tags on February 22, 2021 by Cade

montgomery1
April 15, 1933 – May 18, 1995

Born into entertainment, Elizabeth Montgomery’s mother was a stage actress and her father, Robert Montgomery, was a successful TV and movie star. Young Elizabeth made her Broadway debut at just 20, earning a Theatre World Award for her performance in Late Love. She appeared in a string of TV shows following that and had already earned one Emmy nomination by the time she landed her most famous role. From 1964-1972 she played magical-nose-twitching Samantha Stevens on ABC’s beloved sitcom, Bewitched.

Continue reading

Chet Atkins

Posted in Harpeth Hills Memory Gardens with tags , , , on February 15, 2021 by Cade

atkins3
June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001

Iconic guitarist, instrumentalist and producer, Chester “Chet” Atkins rarely basked in the limelight during his 50+ year career. He was more than happy to play on a friend’s record, or churn out hit after hit from the helm of the now-legendary RCA Victor studio in Nashville, Tennessee. That is not to say he wasn’t gifted in his own right. You don’t win 14 Grammys, 9 CMA awards or earn the nickname “Mr. Guitar” by being a slouch. But his biggest contribution to the music industry was undoubtedly his time spent cultivating the “Nashville Sound” that allowed Country music to successfully cross over to Pop audiences throughout the 1950s and ’60s.

Continue reading